The Top 10 Tallest Bridges in the World and Where to Find Them

The Top 10 Tallest Bridges in the World and Where to Find Them
The Top 10 Tallest Bridges in the World and Where to Find Them

When it comes to bridges it is often easier to understand how long they are like those in my post “The Worlds Longest Bridges” and even how high up they are. But what about how tall they are?!? These are the ten tallest bridges in the world and they are measured from the lowest visible point of a bridge, all the way up to the highest point on the tallest tower. So with that measurement in mind lets take a look upwards at some very tall bridges…

 


The Top 10 Tallest Bridges in the World and Where to Find Them


 

Jingyue Bridge in China
Jingyue Bridge in China

10 – Jingyue Bridge in China – Structural height: 265 metres (869 ft)

Opened in June 2010 this cable-stayed bridge goes over the Yangtze River between Jianli County, Hubei Province and Yueyang, Hunan Province in central China.

Duge Bridge in China
Duge Bridge in China

9 – Duge Bridge in China – Structural height: 269 metres (883 ft)

Opened in December 2016 this is once again a cable-stayed bridge but this is also officially the highest in the world and sits 565 meters above the Beipan River.

Yi Sun-sin Bridge in South Korea
Yi Sun-sin Bridge in South Korea

8 – Yi Sun-sin Bridge in South Korea – Structural height: 270 metres (890 ft)

Opened in May 2012 this suspension bridge is one part of the approach road to the Yeosu Industrial Complex. It is also the world’s fifth longest suspension bridge in terms of bridge span.

Akashi Kaikyō Bridge in Japan
Akashi Kaikyō Bridge in Japan

7 – Akashi Kaikyō Bridge in Japan – Structural height: 282.8 metres (928 ft)

Opened in April 1998 this suspension bridge has the longest central span of any suspension bridge in the world at 1,991 metres (6,532 ft) which helps it connect the city of Kobe on the Japanese mainland of Honshu to Iwaya on Awaji Island.

Chishi Bridge in China
Chishi Bridge in China

6 – Chishi Bridge in China – Structural height: 288 metres (945 ft)

Opened in October 2016 this road bridge crosses the valley 380 meters below and helps the G76 Xiamen–Chengdu Expressway carry on its path cutting through China.

Stonecutters Bridge in Hong Kong
Stonecutters Bridge in Hong Kong

5 – Stonecutters Bridge in Hong Kong – Structural height: 298 metres (978 ft)

Opened in December 2009 cable-stayed bridge that crosses the Rambler Channel in Hong Kong. It was such a vast engineering job that it featured on not one, but two of the Discovery Channel’s Extreme Engineering series!

Sutong Bridge in China
Sutong Bridge in China

4 – Sutong Bridge in China – Structural height: 306 metres (1,004 ft)

This beautiful cable-stayed bridge was opened in May 2008 and spans the Yangtze River in China between Nantong and Changshu. Two of this bridges towers are the third tallest in the world but are often counted as just one.

Russky Bridge in Russia
Russky Bridge in Russia

3 – Russky Bridge in Russia – Structural height: 320.9 metres (1,053 ft)

There aren’t that many cable-stayed bridges in Russia, but this one is the longest cable-stayed bridge in the world and was opened in July 2012 and is said to have cost over £1 Billion to build.

Yavuz Sultan Selim Bridge in Turkey
Yavuz Sultan Selim Bridge in Turkey

2 – Yavuz Sultan Selim Bridge in Turkey – Structural height: 322 metres (1,056 ft)

It was once called the “Third Bosphorus Bridge” and is located near the Black Sea entrance of the Bosphorus Strait. It was opened in August 2016 and it had its foundation stone laying ceremony on 29th of May 2013.

Millau Viaduct in France
Millau Viaduct in France

1 – Millau Viaduct in France – Structural height: 343 metres (1,125 ft)

This stunning cable-stayed bridge spans the gorge valley of the River Tarn in southern France. and its tallest tower mast is 343.0 metres (1,125.3 ft) above the base of the structure. Designed by English architect Sir Norman Foster and French structural engineer Michel Virlogeux it was opened on December 2004 and is said to be built to last at least 120 years. By that time who knows what this list will look like!

Which one did you like?

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