Ten Amazing Insects That All Look Like Leaves

There are thousands of insect species that live in nature and these are divided into various subspecies according to their habitat, diet and appearance. Some species live on soils as their habitat, some live on trees, and some live on plants. It is the plant-based ones that cover most of the insects on this list. Most of the insects you will see have a natural camouflage feature which is genetically present in many living species in nature.  But what makes these so special is that these ten can camouflage themselves to such an extent that you cannot see them unless you look very carefully. In fact, it can be almost impossible to distinguish insect species from the real leaves surrounding them…

Giant Leaf Insect (Pulchriphyllium giganteum)

Giant Leaf Insect (Pulchriphyllium giganteum)

WIKI: Pulchriphyllium giganteum, commonly known as the Giant Malaysian Leaf insect, is a species of leaf insect described in Malaysia by Hausleithner in 1984 and placed in the genus Pulchriphyllium since 2021. Pulchriphyllium giganteum is the largest species belonging to the genus Pulchriphyllium reaching 105 mm in size. They are found most abundantly in the west Malaysian tropics

Indian Orange Oakleaf Butterfly (Kallima inachus)

Indian Orange Oakleaf Butterfly (Kallima inachus)

WIKI: Kallima inachus, the orange oakleaf, Indian oakleaf or dead leaf, is a nymphalid butterfly found in Tropical Asia from India to Japan. With wings closed, it closely resembles a dry leaf with dark veins and is a commonly cited example of camouflage.

False Katydid (Phaneropterinae)

False Katydid (Phaneropterinae)

WIKI: The Phaneropterinae, the sickle-bearing bush crickets or leaf katydids, are a subfamily of insects within the family Tettigoniidae. Nearly 2,060 species in 85 genera throughout the world are known. They are also known as false katydids or round-headed katydids.

Dead Leaf Mimic Moth (Uropyia meticulodina)

Dead Leaf Mimic Moth (Uropyia meticulodina)

WIKI: Uropyia meticulodina is a species of moth of the family Notodontidae first described by Oberthür in 1884. It is found in Taiwan, Japan and the Chinese provinces of Yunnan, Hubei and Shaanxi. The wingspan is 45–55 mm. Adults are dead leaf mimics.

Dead-Leaf Grasshopper (Chorotypidae)

Dead-Leaf Grasshopper (Chorotypidae)

WIKI: Chorotypidae is a family of tropical Asian grasshoppers (order Orthoptera), formerly included within the family Eumastacidae. These grasshoppers have a head that rises above the level of the thorax and short antennae. Some species have reduced wings, others have wings that widen towards the tips and still others have a flattened leaf-like shape.

Luna Moth (Actias luna)

Luna Moth (Actias luna)

WIKI: The Luna moth also known as the American moon moth is a Nearctic moth in the family Saturniidae, subfamily Saturniinae, a group commonly known as giant silk moths. It has lime-green colored wings and a white body. The larvae are also green.

The Spiny Leaf Insect (Extatosoma tiaratum)

The Spiny Leaf Insect (Extatosoma tiaratum)

WIKI: Extatosoma tiaratum, commonly known as the spiny leaf insect, the giant prickly stick insect, Macleay’s spectre, or the Australian walking stick, is a large species of Australian stick insect endemic to Australia.

Planthopper (Fulgoroidea)

Planthopper (Fulgoroidea)

WIKI: A planthopper is any insect in the infraorder Fulgoromorpha, in the suborder Auchenorrhyncha, a group exceeding 12,500 described species worldwide.

Blue Oakleaf Butterfly (Kallima horsfieldii)

Blue Oakleaf Butterfly (Kallima horsfieldii)

WIKI: Kallima horsfieldii, the blue oakleaf, southern blue oakleaf or Sahyadri blue oakleaf, is a nymphalid butterfly found in India. The underside appears like a leaf complete with midrib while the upperside is brilliantly coloured.

Green Shield Bug (Palomena prasina)

Green Shield Bug (Palomena prasina)

WIKI: The green shield bug is a European shield bug species in the family Pentatomidae. The name might equally apply to several other species in the tribe Nezarini, or if referred-to as a “green stink bug”, it might more appropriately belong to the larger North American bug, Acrosternum hilare.

Which of these amazing insects did you like the most? Have you seen any of these in real life? Do let us know in the comments below.